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MIND COACH

INTRODUCTION

Who Is Hexa Kids

Hexa kids is a right brain training program for kids age 6 months above. Our program has helped kids learn faster and unleash their highest potential. We offer a suitable and careful approach to your child’s primary education by providing all the necessary tools for your children to stimulate their creative right brain.

Working of the right brain and left brain

The right brain processes visuals and information at a high speed in a subconscious state.

Promote brain growth

Brain growth is fastest when one is young.

Ability to See Big Picture

According to a scientist at Middle Tennessee State University, the right side of the brain looks at the “big picture.” This is helpful with building projects and problem-solving

Love and Affection

In Dr. Paul Mclean’s evolutionary triune brain theory, he proposed that the human brain was in reality three brains all rolled into one.

WHAT SPECIALISTS

ARE SAYING

An interest in the brain requires no justification other than a curiosity to know why we are here, what we are doing here, and where we are going.

Dr. Paul Maclean

AMERICAN PHYSICIAN AND NEUROSCIENTIST

HEXA KIDS MOST POPULAR

Right Brain Activities

All
Advance Knowledge
Artistic Activities
Basic Knowledge
Five Senses Training
Reading & Memorize
Relax & Interact

Hexa Kids right brain training program has helped children reach their developmental milestones. Our program is based on the Developmental Milestone of US Health Department of Paediatrician.

What most babies do by this age:
– Social/Emotional Milestones
Is shy, clingy, or fearful around strangers
– Shows several facial expressions, like happy, sad, angry, and surprised
– Looks when you call her name
– Reacts when you leave (looks, reaches for you, or cries)
– Smiles or laughs when you play peek-a-boo

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Makes a lot of different sounds like “mamamama” and “bababababa”
– Lifts arms up to be picked up
– Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
– Looks for objects when dropped out of sight (like his spoon or toy)
– Bangs two things together

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Gets to a sitting position by herself
– Moves things from one hand to her other hand
– Uses fingers to “rake” food towards himself
– Sits without support

What most children do by this age:
– Social/Emotional Milestones
– Plays games with you, like pat-a-cake

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Waves “bye-bye”
– Calls a parent “mama” or “dada” or another special name
– Understands “no” (pauses briefly or stops when you say it)
– Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
– Puts something in a container, like a block in a cup
– Looks for things he sees you hide, like a toy under a blanket

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Pulls up to stand
– Walks, holding on to furniture
– Drinks from a cup without a lid, as you hold it
– Picks things up between thumb and pointer finger, like small bits of food

What most babies do by this age:
Social/Emotional Milestones:
– Moves away from you, but looks to make sure you are close by
– Points to show you something interesting
– Puts hands out for you to wash them
– Looks at a few pages in a book with you
– Helps you dress him by pushing arm through sleeve or lifting up foot

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Tries to say three or more words besides “mama” or “dada”
– Follows one-step directions without any gestures, like giving you the toy when you say, “Give it to me.”
– Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
– Copies you doing chores, like sweeping with a broom
– Plays with toys in a simple way, like pushing a toy car

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Walks without holding on to anyone or anything
– Scribbles
– Drinks from a cup without a lid and may spill sometimes
– Feeds herself with her fingers
– Tries to use a spoon
– Climbs on and off a couch or chair without help

What most children do by this age:
Social/Emotional Milestones:
– Notices when others are hurt or upset, like pausing or looking sad when someone is crying
– Looks at your face to see how to react in a new situation

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Points to things in a book when you ask, like “Where is the bear?”
– Says at least two words together, like “More milk.”
– Points to at least two body parts when you ask him to show you
– Uses more gestures than just waving and pointing, like blowing a kiss or nodding yes
– Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
– Holds something in one hand while using the other hand; for example, holding a container and taking the lid off
– Tries to use switches, knobs, or buttons on a toy
– Plays with more than one toy at the same time, like putting toy food on a toy plate

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Kicks a ball
– Runs
– Walks (not climbs) up a few stairs with or without help
– Eats with a spoon

What most children do by this age:
Social/Emotional Milestones:
– Calms down within 10 minutes after you leave her, like at a childcare drop off
– Notices other children and joins them to play

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Talks with you in conversation using at least two back-and-forth exchanges
– Asks “who,” “what,” “where,” or “why” questions, like “Where is mommy/daddy?”
– Says what action is happening in a picture or book when asked, like “running,” “eating,” or “playing”
– Says first name, when asked
– Talks well enough for others to understand, most of the time

Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving):
– Draws a circle, when you show him how
– Avoids touching hot objects, like a stove, when you warn her

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Strings items together, like large beads or macaroni
– Puts on some clothes by himself, like loose pants or a jacket
– Uses a fork

What most children do by this age:
Social/Emotional Milestones:
– Pretends to be something else during play (teacher, superhero, dog)
– Asks to go play with children if none are around, like “Can I play with Alex?”
– Comforts others who are hurt or sad, like hugging a crying friend
– Avoids danger, like not jumping from tall heights at the playground
– Likes to be a “helper”
– Changes behavior based on where she is (place of worship, library, playground)

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Says sentences with four or more words
– Says some words from a song, story, or nursery rhyme
– Talks about at least one thing that happened during his day, like “I played soccer.”
– Answers simple questions like “What is a coat for?” or “What is a crayon for?”
– Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving)
– Names a few colors of items
– Tells what comes next in a well-known story
– Draws a person with three or more body parts

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Catches a large ball most of the time
– Serves himself food or pours water, with adult supervision
– Unbuttons some buttons
– Holds crayon or pencil between fingers and thumb (not a fist)

What most children do by this age:
Social/Emotional Milestones:
– Follows rules or takes turns when playing games with other children
– Sings, dances, or acts for you
– Does simple chores at home, like matching socks or clearing the table after eating

Language/Communication Milestones:
– Tells a story she heard or made up with at least two events. For example, a cat was stuck in a tree and a firefighter saved it
– Answers simple questions about a book or story after you read or tell it to him
– Keeps a conversation going with more than three back-and-forth exchanges
– Uses or recognizes simple rhymes (bat-cat, ball-tall)

Cognitive Milestones (learning, thinking, problem-solving):
– Counts to 10
– Names some numbers between 1 and 5 when you point to them
– Uses words about time, like “yesterday,” “tomorrow,” “morning,” or “night”
– Pays attention for 5 to 10 minutes during activities. For example, during story time or making arts and crafts (screen time does not count)
– Writes some letters in her name
– Names some letters when you point to them

Movement/Physical Development Milestones:
– Buttons some buttons
– Hops on one foot

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    6 HEXA REASONS

    Your Child Has Unlimited Potential

    1. Powerful Memory

    Children who have attended our program will have photographic memory. Memory recollections can teach them very important life lessons, demonstrate skills and abilities.

    1. Powerful Memory

    Children who have attended our program will have photographic memory. Memory recollections can teach them very important life lessons, demonstrate skills and abilities.

    2. Critical Thinking

    Critical thinkers who can make sense of information, analyze patterns, compare and contrast, evaluate ideas to form opinions, explain why things happen and generate higher order thinking skills.

    2. Critical Thinking

    Critical thinkers who can make sense of information, analyze patterns, compare and contrast, evaluate ideas to form opinions, explain why things happen and generate higher order thinking skills.

    3. Empathy & Values

    Enable one to understand one’s own emotions as well as the emotions of others and determine how you react appropriately to them. This includes a person’s ability to handle conflicts, negotiate, and communicate.

    3. Empathy & Values

    Enable one to understand one’s own emotions as well as the emotions of others and determine how you react appropriately to them. This includes a person’s ability to handle conflicts, negotiate, and communicate.

    4. Rapid learning

    Able to absorb any new material given to them in a short period of time. Helps process tons of information at a faster pace to come out with a sensible answer.

    4. Rapid learning

    Able to absorb any new material given to them in a short period of time. Helps process tons of information at a faster pace to come out with a sensible answer.

    5. Cognitive Creativity

    Knowing in depth a subject to make new connections, form original ideas and come up with a creative solution.

    5. Cognitive Creativity

    Knowing in depth a subject to make new connections, form original ideas and come up with a creative solution.

    6. Intuition

    The ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning. Help make better decisions and reach positive outcomes.

    6. Intuition

    The ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning. Help make better decisions and reach positive outcomes.

    The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.

    ALBERT EINSTEIN

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